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Twin. Where have you been?

When you find someone who complements your wavelengths, nobody knows you like they do. Here’s a throwback to when Webb's infrared data was combined with ultraviolet and visible-light data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope for a more comprehensive view of galaxy pair VV 191.

Webb’s new data traced light from the bright elliptical galaxy (left) through the winding spiral galaxy (right), allowing astronomers to investigate the effects of interstellar dust in the latter. Webb also revealed a faint red arc at the center of the left galaxy to be a very distant galaxy, magnified and warped in appearance by the gravity of the elliptical galaxy!

Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, Rogier Windhorst (ASU), William Keel (University of Alabama), Stuart Wyithe (University of Melbourne), JWST PEARLS Team

#universe #nasa #jwst #webb #telescope

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Here’s your golden ticket to the star factory 🌟

Located approximately 35 million light-years away, NGC 1559 is a barred spiral galaxy. Its massive arms are abound with star formation.

In this image, Webb’s Mid-Infrared Instrument captures the glow of interstellar dust grains, while its Near-Infrared Camera shows the light from stars — even young stars hidden behind vast amounts of dust.

Credit: ESA/Webb, NASA & CSA, A. Leroy, J. Lee and the PHANGS Team

#universe #nasa #jwst #webb #telescope

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She comes in colors everywhere 🎵

Webb and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have brought you one of the most colorful and comprehensive views of the universe ever taken. This image showcases MACS0416, a gigantic galaxy cluster located about 4.3 billion light-years from Earth.
Colors were mapped to different wavelengths of light. Galaxies colored blue are relatively nearby and full of intense star formation, as best detected in visible light by Hubble. Galaxies colored red are typically farther or dustier, as best detected with Webb’s infrared vision.
One object stood out in this field: a monstrously bright star nicknamed “Mothra,” located in a galaxy that existed 3 billion years after the big bang. This star has been magnified by the gravity of the galaxy cluster — plus a mystery object — by a factor of at least 4,000 times!

Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, Jose M. Diego (IFCA), Jordan C. J. D'Silva (UWA), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Jake Summers (ASU), Rogier Windhorst (ASU), Haojing Yan (University of Missouri)

#universe #nasa #jwst #webb #telescope

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Wish upon 500,000 stars 🌟
Take in this magical view of the heart of our home galaxy. Seen by Webb in unprecedented detail, Sagittarius C is a star-forming region about 300 light-years away from the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way’s center.
In this image, a cluster of baby stars glows through the cocoon of a dusty cloud. At the heart of the cluster is a still-forming star over 30 times the mass of our Sun. Wrapping around the dense cloud of dust is a previously unseen region of ionized hydrogen gas (colored cyan). Within are intriguing needle-like structures, chaotically oriented, that scientists hope to study further.
The galactic center is only 25,000 light years away from Earth, close enough for Webb to study individual stars. Webb’s data will help astronomers learn more about star formation in an extreme cosmic environment — and along with it, the origin story of our universe.

Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, Samuel Crowe (UVA)

#universe #nasa #jwst #webb #telescope

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Everything is not as it seems 🪄
See that string along the bottom of this image? It’s made up of 2 baby stars spewing out almost parallel jets of gas. Astronomers used to think there was just one star, but Webb’s high-resolution view shows more to the story.
The “string” here is Herbig-Haro (HH) 797. A Herbig-Haro object is the bright region that surrounds newborn stars, formed when the stars’ outflows collide with nearby gas and dust at high speeds.
In the top half of the image, those bright objects are actually thought to contain two further baby stars! Webb’s infrared vision is particularly suited for studying young stars and their outflows, as infrared light can pierce through obscuring gas and dust.

Credit: ESA/Webb, NASA & CSA, T. Ray (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies)
#universe #nasa #jwst #webb #telescope

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