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Holi the Origin,Story Fall of Tyrant,Tale of Love & Colour

    Sundeep Chhabra
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    By Sundeep Chhabra
    Holi the Origin,Story Fall of Tyrant,Tale of Love & Colour

    Origin of Holi – The Festival of Colors

    Krishna and Radha Playing Holi

    Also known by the name Fagu Purnima around the world, a global festival it is indeed, for the powder that revellers throw on each other, leaving festival-goers coated in colour by the end of the day, the Hindu spring festival is rightly called the Festival of Colors.

    Holi origin inscriptions in ancient texts Holi ceremony and rituals find a mention in “Bhavishya Purana” and “Narad Purana”. “Jamini Mimansa” is another source where rituals associated with Holi is mentioned. A stone inscription dating back to more than 300 years ago has “Holikotsav” engraved on it. This stone was found in Ramgarh in Vindhya Province. You will also come across the word Holi in Ratnavali that was written during the 7th century when King Harsha ruled. This further strengthens the fact that Holi was observed several years before Christ.

    Observed much pomp and splendour, it lasts in most regions for a night and a day, starting on the evening of Purnima, the full moon day of the Month Phalguna, in the Georgian calendar which falls somewhere between the end of February and middle of March. The festival of colours has two famous stories of how it started to be celebrated, i.e. the origin of Holi.

    However, colours and rich traditional cuisine isn’t all to the festival, it, in fact, has a deeply-rooted historical significance, the triumph of good over evil; the day officially marks the arrival of the much-awaited spring bringing the gloomy days of the winter to an end, and for farmers, they celebrate it as the thanksgiving for good harvest.

    To read  more ivisit at Origin of Holi

     

     

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