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    • Robert J Berryhill
      • 5/5 (1 votes)
      Bookmark by Robert J Berryhill

      Robert J Berryhill is a results driven Real Estate Executive with over 35 years of Commercial Real Estate Development. Robert Berryhill has developed in excess of $3.8 billion dollars in real estate in over 43 states and 2 countries.

      • Michael Marczell
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        Bookmark by Michael Marczell

        Michael Marczell is a highly experienced leader, managing global teams and multi-million- dollar supply chains in diverse industries is a background in business leadership, financial strategy, process design, and account management, along with his competitive approach and history in philanthropy makes him a human and result-oriented leader for any business.

        Michael Marczell | The Maestro of Business Strategist | USA

        www.yumpu.com

        Michael Marczell is a highly experienced leader, managing global teams and multi-million- dollar supply chains in diverse industries is a background in business leadership, financial strategy, process design, and account management, along with his...

        • Dr.Sue Cornbluth
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          You know when you’re getting ganged up on.  You loving child starts sounding like your ex, or they roll their eyes at you, or criticize things that are beyond the scope of parenting.  You are most likely the victim of parental alienation. 

          Often in a divorce, one side feels like a victim and will use the kids to get back at the other parent.  They may confide in them in inappropriate ways, treating the child like a friend, confidant or even therapist.  Although it may make you feel better to “overshare” with the kids, the child loses out for so many reasons:   

          First, it’s natural for your child to want both parents in his/her life.  When you complain about the other parent, it puts the child in conflict and they become unsure of where to place their loyalty.  Second, you want your child to see a healthy relationship as they form their own romantic connections.  

          Parental Alienation with Dr. Sue Cornbluth
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          Original: https://freetamilebooks.com/ebooks/aathimaruthuvar/
          By: admin
          Posted: January 16, 2021, 2:28 pm

          ஆதி மருத்துவர் சவர தொழிலாராக்கபட்ட வரலாறு – வரலாறு – கோ ரகுபதி
          • Entertainer
            Entertainer published a blog post Acasa, My Home

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            If it weren’t for the high-rise buildings within eyeshot, you could swear that the opening sequence of the acutely compassionate and probing “Acasa, My Home” was filmed in deep wilderness. During that initial scene, our gaze floats over the sun-dappled surface of a muddy marsh, following a teenaged boy as he swims in murky waters that somehow seem idyllic and catches fish with his bare hands, away from the metropolitan area he seems to be right outside of. Soon enough, he is joined by a number of young boys, whose cheery sounds we hear in a cacophony before their faces appear on camera and watch the older brother dexterously catch a wild water bird. When the poor terrified winged creature manages to escape and run for dear life, the boys go straight back to their carefree afternoon, rolling around in mud, giggling away and wresting amid tall reeds.

            The drone camera then poignantly peels away from this joyous tableau to slowly reveal Bucharest from atop, juxtaposing the bustling capital against the habitat of the youngsters. They are all a part of the Romanian Enache family, an off-the-grid clan that has been residing on a deserted reservoir by the outskirts of Bucharest (named the Bucharest Delta) for nearly two decades. Considering it’s a tribe of eleven—the parents Gica and Niculina and their nine children—it’s appropriate to think of the Enaches as a small village that operates as a single unit in the earlier moments of filmmaker and investigative journalist Radu Ciorniciuc’s impressive debut documentary. It’s a patriarchal band by all accounts where Gica authoritatively calls the shots. Still, all of its members serve a clear purpose in their shared unconventional life. Living in extreme poverty in a self-made shack alongside all sorts of animals—pigs, chickens and dogs among them—every action is a matter of survival for the Enache family in the absence of access to the basics of urban conveniences.

            In a way, “Acasa, My Home” is a real-world “Leave No Trace,” Debra Granik’s recent American drama about an off-the-grid father and daughter rejecting the conformities of a traditional society. Like in that film, Ciorniciuc opens a non-didactic and non-judgmental window for audiences into an alternative world where parents both nurture their babies within the rules of nature and also deprive them of their vital rights, like safety and education. The kids all seem well-adjusted to the ins and outs of their pastoral way of life however—when the concerned authorities and child services make an appearance, there is routine talk amongst them about hiding in their usual spots.

            While those of us equipped with everyday necessities might be inclined to judge the family’s treatment of the wildlife around them, the clan’s actions and existence make sense within the bounds of the reality Ciorniciuc (also one of the cinematographers) rigorously portrays with his elegant, eye-level camera. (It mostly stays put and respectfully detached as the subjects walk in and out of it in an effortless fashion.) But the organic order of things come to an abrupt, almost cruel end for the Enaches when the Romanian government takes a long-planned step to convert the land of their home into a so-called nature preserve. Officials arrive with their orders soon after. And for a brief while, the Enache patriarch receives an artificial sort of respect from them as the land’s former groundskeeper. Somewhere amid the press circus, even Prince Charles makes a short appearance to promote the project that apparently carries some international significance. But the tables turn when social services relocate the family into a crammed home where they’d have to adjust to the rules of a regular community; something Gica had decided to avoid like the plague a long time ago.

            Guess who embraces and adopts the charms of the modern world the fastest? Illiterate and isolated until then, the Enache kids (at least most of them) prove to be quick studies. And with his unprecedented, trust-based access to the family for nearly four years, Ciorniciuc captures their transition with such devoted precision. There are blissful haircuts, good old-fashioned school work and much smartphone scrolling in the lives of the Enache kids now; all of which Ciorniciuc films with a keen yet unobtrusive eye while the children replace their parents as key subjects on the foreground.

            And yet, this isn’t a rosy story of urban transformation. As the kids—especially the oldest, Vali—reconcile their old lives with the new, grudges rise up to the surface and heartbreaking generational confrontations take place, with some of the young ones admitting to missing the Delta’s sense of freedom and the rest, resenting their parents for not as much as teaching them how to read and write. While the filmmaker tries to neatly bring the complex tale to a close in its final minutes, it feels like a different story takes off at the conclusion of Ciorniciuc’s compact 80-something minutes; one that would encompass new jobs, a newborn, distressingly uncertain prospects, and even higher-than-before stakes in the midst of an unforgiving urban jungle.

            Now playing in theaters and in virtual cinemas. 




            Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/acasa-my-home-movie-review-2021
            By: Tomris Laffly
            Posted: January 15, 2021, 1:39 pm

            • Entertainer
              Entertainer published a blog post Outside the Wire

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              It is the year 2036. (If this review had a soundtrack, it would play a Hans-Zimmer-inflected variant of a dramatic “dum-DUM” musical bit right now.) Eastern Europe is engulfed in civil war—the sort of civil war that enables filmmakers to keep the ideologies vague and the names sinister-sounding. (“No need to ask, he’s a”) drone operator Lieutenant Harp (Damson Idris) disobeys a direct order to take out a deadly truck. He saves about three dozen soldiers but two fighting men perish. There is bad feeling all around.

              He’s sent back to training, but he’s really on a secret mission, working with one Captain Leo (Anthony Mackie). Like Harp, he’s Black, and like Harp, he cusses a bit. Unlike Harp, he’s a cyborg—“fourth generation biotech and I’m giving you 60 seconds to deal with it.”

              Leaving base, they witness some soldiers heaping abuse on a more obvious robot soldier—these dumb guys are called “Gumps,” get it?—and Leo looks on ruefully. Once back in Eastern Europe, and on the hunt for a madman named Victor Koval (what did I tell you about the names) who’s after some nuclear codes (plus ça change in semi-hacky war/espionage movies), Leo demonstrates some advantages of not being human. He operates with a kind of realpolitik—doesn’t act out of sentiment, stays focused on the immediate. Or so it seems. “I have the ability to break the rules,” he tells Hart. He likes Hart because of his drone decision by the way—says he needs someone who can “think outside the box.” Paradoxically, though, he tells Hart, “Maybe humans aren’t emotional enough, Lieutenant.”

              Directed with a brisk not-quite chaos cinema style by Mikael Håfström from a script by Rowan Athale and Rob Yescombe, the movie waits a good 50 minutes before showing Leo as a real fighting machine but doesn’t take it too far. Yeah, he can kick multiple asses with haste but he doesn’t run like a Robert Patrick model Terminator or anything. (Glenn Close in “Hillbilly Elegy” would be unimpressed.) As for cerebral endowments, despite being in Eastern Europe Leo doesn’t have to be as much of a super linguist as you’d expect from a robot because in THIS Eastern Europe all but a very few speak perfect English as a default.

              The fact that the two characters are black is a red herring; race doesn’t really figure here even as a metaphor. Instead, the movie’s plot and the interaction of the two characters focuses on the robot’s true mission, and the conclusions to which his autonomous robot-thought has brought him. When Leo introduces Hart to an Irish “resistance” fighter, the Lieutenant begins to suspect that, while a product of American ingenuity, Leo might have intentions very contrary to American orders. And indeed, it turns out that Leo, like Hebrew National, is set on answering to a higher authority, one with which fans of “Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan” will be quite familiar.

              And so we are treated to almost every cliché in the book, complete with dialogue like “Sometimes you gotta get dirty to see the real change” and “Humans could learn to do better” and a countdown readout in big red letters at the movie’s climax. The visual effects are decent, the cast is better than decent, and that’s all, folks.

              Now playing on Netflix. 




              Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/outside-the-wire-movie-review-2021
              By: Glenn Kenny
              Posted: January 15, 2021, 1:41 pm

              • Entertainer
                Entertainer published a blog post Some Kind of Heaven

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                Robert Browning promised that old age would be "the last of life for which the first is made." But in "Some Kind of Heaven," a documentary about a retirement community with a population the size of New Haven, we see that for better and worse and despite the best efforts of all involved, the last of life is filled with many of the same uncertainties, conflicts, loneliness, and fears of all the other ages. 

                Sometimes referred to as "God's waiting room," The Villages in Florida is designed to create a problem-free world for financially comfortable over-55 residents who want to live in a gentle fantasy of perpetual fun and companionship. The over 3,000 group activities include belly dancing (to Dean Martin singing "Let it Snow," not the obvious choice for more than one reason), a marching band, water ballet, Parrothead meetings (for fans of Jimmy Buffett and margaritas), and the Golf Cart Precision Drill Team. There seems to be a group made up exclusively of women named Elaine. Over 20,000 70- and 80-something singles go clubbing every night. "Blurred Lines" takes on a second meaning when the dancing couples wear bifocals.  

                Even the "news" comes from a Villages-only television station and newspaper. A front-page story might be about a resident's new red sports car. "I don't see slums. I don't see death and destruction," a resident says with relief. Like a perpetual luxury cruise ship or a residential all-inclusive resort, The Villages have everything the community could ever want or need within its gates. Indeed, everything is designed to make sure they never want or need to leave. "Everything here is just so positive I'm at a loss for words," one resident says cheerfully. Like the lotus eaters who forget everything but the pleasures of the present moment described in Tennyson's poem, it is "a land in which it seemed always afternoon." Everything is designed to keep the residents free from worry. Even a sales pitch about pre-paid funerals glosses over the icky part—death—to focus on the relief from having to worry about rising costs. 

                One of the most intriguing revelations in the film comes from the son of the community's founder. Like Disneyland's iconic Main Street, the look of The Villages was specifically created to inspire a comforting sense of nostalgia, created for aging baby boomers to represent an idealized past. It was so idealized that early visitors insisted on knowing "the story." They did not mean the real story of how the idea for The Villages was envisioned. They wanted a pretend story, a kind of bedtime story. And so, the buildings in the town center have mythic and completely imaginary backstories. We see a close-up of an artistic fake crack in the fake adobe facade of one storefront.

                There are a dozen different movies you could make about The Villages. The recent feature films "Poms" and "Just Getting Started" have used a setting like it for dramedies starring aging Oscar winners, and the horror movie "Vivarium" has a young couple in a similarly idyllic-seeming housing development. I would like to see a documentary that focuses on the staff that keeps everything looking so pristine and seamless. Or one based on the New York Times articles referring to The Villages as a "nation-state" and analyzing the shift away from the residents' overwhelming support of Donald Trump's candidacy in 2016 toward Biden in 2020. Or a look at the kind of self-selection that characterizes the people who want to live in a place like this, all of whom appear to be white, and whether freedom from everyday worries makes for a happier life. This film, though, made in partnership with the New York Times and executive produced by Darren Aronofsky, and the first full-length documentary by writer/director (and Florida native) Lance Oppenheim, is more interested in a few of the individuals than in the larger story.

                That includes Reggie, who has decided to spend his final years a bit buzzed but whose lack of filters and communion with the spirits may be the result of a series of small strokes in addition to the weed and cocaine. A dapper 81-year-old lives in a van and sneaks in to The Villages pools to try to meet a rich woman willing to take him in. A recent widow makes her first tentative efforts at a new romance with a friendly golf cart salesman known for his potent margaritas at the Parrothead gatherings. The film can get fractured and lose momentum, but the way it cuts back and forth between her description of their conversation and the conversation itself is charming. 

                It is also a reminder that even in the paradise of The Villages, starting a new relationship can be scary and painful. As can being alone, even in the world of fake cracked adobe and senior citizen water ballet.

                Now playing in theaters and available on demand.




                Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/some-kind-of-heaven-movie-review-2021
                By: Nell Minow
                Posted: January 15, 2021, 1:39 pm

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                Sam Pollard’s documentary “MLK/FBI” addresses what the FBI’s former director James Comey calls “the darkest chapter in the bureau’s history”: the deliberate and systematic surveillance and harassment of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Based in part on newly-declassified files, “MLK/FBI” has generated potent Oscar buzz in one of the Academy’s most fickle categories. For Pollard, 70, King was a towering figure when he grew up in East Harlem. “In my home, we had three pictures on our wall,” he said in a Zoom interview, with RogerEbert.com. “Dr. Martin Luther King, John F. Kennedy and Jesus Christ.”

                Four pivotal events changed his youthful conception of America as a country in which distinguishing the good guys from the bad guys was as simple as the white or black hats they wore in old movies or TV shows. The first was Nov. 22, 1963, when his middle school teacher informed the class that school was going to close because John F. Kennedy had been shot in Dallas. Pollard was 13. The second was April 2, 1968, when Pollard turned 18. The third was two days later, when he watched America’s most trusted anchorman, Walter Cronkite, report that Dr. King had been assassinated in Memphis on the balcony of the Lorraine Hotel. A few months later, Robert Kennedy was assassinated.

                “Those were my teen years,” Pollard ruefully said.

                And the FBI? “They were heroes,” Pollard said he believed at the time, based in part on positive portrayals in such films as “Big Jim McLain” starring John Wayne and “The FBI Story” starring James Stewart (clips of both are featured in “MLK/FBI”) and the Quinn-Martin TV series, “The FBI.” “Every Sunday night, I would be in front of my television,” Pollard said with a laugh, intoning the cast: Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., William Reynolds and Philip Abbott.

                Which is why Pollard, editor of Spike Lee’s “Clockers” and “Bamboozled,” and whose directing credits include episodes of the Peabody Award-winning series, “Eyes on the Prize” and documentaries about Marvin Gaye, Sammy Davis, Jr. and August Wilson for “American Masters,” would not have made “MLK/FBI” 20 years ago, he said. “I was still holding on to the notion that in America the good people were out there to thwart the bad people. The good guys wore the white hats and the bad guys wore the black hats.”

                Pointedly, he begins “MLK/FBI” with a clip of Ronald Reagan introducing a television program with the advisory that “In the traditional motion picture story, the villains are defeated, the ending is a happy one. I can make no such promise for the picture you’re about to watch. The story isn’t over.”

                How familiar were you with the extent of the FBI’s surveillance of Dr. King, and what new information did you learn that compelled you to make "MLK/FBI"?

                I didn’t know the depth of the surveillance. My producer, Benjamin Hedin, read The F.B.I. and Martin Luther King, Jr. by David Garrow. We had already worked together on "Two Trains Runnin’," and he said, "I think I found our next film." I happen to know Garrow because he was a major consultant on "Eyes on the Prize." I read the book, and I said, "You’re right, this is our next film."

                Did you consult with the King family or seek their blessing, as the documentary does address his personal life and extramarital affairs.

                We knew from past history that the King family is very intent about holding on to Dr. King’s image, so I thought we should stay away from them, knowing full well that when the film came out, we would hear from them or the King estate. But there has not been a peep.

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                A key question posed in the film is the responsibility of historians. What responsibilities did you feel as a filmmaker in presenting this story?

                I feel my responsibility is to look at the subject in a nuanced way, flaws and all. I used to want to look at Dr. King in one way: He was the great leader of the Civil Rights movement, he took us from a world of segregation to a world of integration, he had this phenomenal "I have a dream" speech, he was there when the Voting Rights Act and the Civil Rights Act were passed. He was on the front lines all the time. But I also wanted to shape the narrative to show that he was also a human being. He was, like many of us, dealing with many things. He was constantly being monitored by the FBI, he knew (that at any time) he could be shot and assassinated, he was probably stupefied that he got the Nobel Peace Prize, a man who by 1967 said he felt very strongly that we should not be in Vietnam, knowing full well the pushback he would get from Lyndon Johnson, who had been a great supporter of his. So you see him in our film in moments when he looks weary and burdensome. It’s because he had a lot on his mind, plus dealing with his own personal life, which was very complicated.

                The F.B.I. surveillance tapes, which were created to tarnish Dr. King’s reputation as “the moral leader of our nation,” will be released in 2027. Are you concerned about bad actors using the scandalous material to tarnish his image? Do you see this film as a way to get ahead of the story?

                They will, and not really. What you said is very important. Those who have never felt the same kind of love and respect that I have for Dr. King, will feel the same way when those tapes come out. That will give them the fodder to say, "See, I told you he was a horrible man; he was worse than even J. Edgar Hoover said." We live in a country where there is freedom of speech, and even though I may disagree what some people say at times, they have a right to say it. The question I and my producer had to ask ourselves was were we doing the job of the FBI? if we had been more tawdry in our approach I would have said yes. But we were much more responsible and even-handed in how we dealt with things. I wasn’t trying to create any gotcha moments.

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                I was struck watching the man-on-the-street news footage of people waving pamphlets and insisting they had proof that Dr. King went to so-called Communist school. I immediately thought of all those who say the same thing about Joe Biden and Democrats.

                Not much has changed. That’s what was so bad what we saw about January 6 at the Capitol. On one level, I’m horrified and disgusted, but on the other level, I’m thinking, Damn, our country is still the same. You look at the run-up to the election and listen to Donald Trump’s speeches about if you elect Democrats they will come destroy the suburbs and your community. This is insanity. Have we not learned any lessons in America?

                "MLK/FBI" is striking in the absence of talking heads. Your interviewees’ commentary is heard on the soundtrack.

                I had seen a documentary in 2011 called "The Black Power Mix Tape 1967-1975" (directed by Horan Hugo Olsson) with all these wonderful images of the Black Panther Party, Angela Davis, Eldridge Cleaver, and others, and there was nobody on camera; you just heard their voices. It really kept me engaged with the footage. So when we were thinking of doing this film, I felt we should keep everybody off camera so the audience will be pulled into the material, watching the March on Washington, the Montgomery bus boycott, watching who the FBI was. That was the strategy. A lot of documentaries are doing it now. If you see "Belushi," the commentary is all off-camera.

                Was there something new you learned about Dr. King in the making of this film that impacted your appreciation of him?

                Looking through the archives, there are images of Dr. King as a family man; footage with his young children, his wife, his parents; him at home at the dinner table. All that was really interesting stuff and footage I hadn’t seen in a long time. It humanizes him in a positive way.

                What do you hope viewers get from "MLK/FBI"?

                America has to come to a reckoning. I hope (viewers) will be able to see that, my god, what happened on January 6th was not an anomaly. It’s part of the American DNA. If America is ever to find its real footing, it has to deal with its history. This is a divided country and it seems like it’s becoming more so every day. I’ve seen this country go through many changes. Sometimes it’s frightening. I happen to be absolutely disgusted and angry over what I saw at the Capitol building.

                Now playing in select theaters and available on demand.




                Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/interviews/america-has-to-come-to-a-reckoning-director-sam-pollard-on-mlkfbi
                By: Donald Liebenson
                Posted: January 15, 2021, 1:42 pm

                • Entertainer
                  Entertainer published a blog post The Marksman

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                  It’s time for your annual Liam Neesoning: that cinematic tradition in which the seasoned star plays a grizzled character with a particular set of skills, which come in handy to dispatch bad guys and rescue good ones. But this year’s entry in the subgenre, “The Marksman,” is particularly mediocre.

                  There’s not much to the character Neeson plays, or anyone else in the film, for that matter. The story is thin, the suspense is wan, and the action sequences are uninspired. Director Robert Lorenz seems to be aiming for the kind of cranky-old-man-on-a-mission movies Clint Eastwood has directed and stars in of late—which makes sense, given that Lorenz has produced several Eastwood films over the past two decades including “Million Dollar Baby” and “Gran Torino” and directed him in “Trouble With the Curve.” But while the sheen of such movies exists here—perhaps too much, given the subject matter—the substance is sorely missing. And despite his ever-formidable presence, Neeson seems to be going through the motions, even as he’s kicking ass.

                  Neeson stars as rancher Jim Hanson, a Marine and decorated Vietnam War veteran living a quiet life in southern Arizona along the Mexico border. It’s been a year since his wife died of cancer, and he spends his days with his trusty dog, Jackson, patrolling the property he’s in danger of losing to the bank. At the film’s start, we see him driving along dusty roads in his pickup with his pooch riding shotgun as the setting sun bathes the desert landscape in a warm glow. An American flag waves in the foreground as he approaches his modest house. Cinematographer Mark Patten shoots this patriotic imagery as if it were a commercial for Chevy trucks—all that’s missing is Bob Seger singing “Like a Rock.”

                  But Jim’s peace is shattered when a mother and son cross into the United States from Mexico through a section of fence that borders his land. They’re on the run from vicious cartel members, and when the mom is shot, Jim agrees to her dying wish that he take care of her tween boy, Miguel (Jacob Perez). Interestingly, Jim takes no political stance on whether they should have entered the country in this manner; ever the pragmatist, he’s more concerned about the prospect of dealing with dead bodies on his property when immigrants succumb to this arduous trek.

                  The kid is understandably shaken into stunned silence, but a Chicago address scribbled on a strip of paper dictates where Jim must take him to reunite him with his family. Somehow, Jim still speaks no Spanish after years of living along the Mexican border—literally, the extent of his vocabulary is “familia” and “comida”—which seems both unlikely and irresponsible. Instead, he talks to the boy in frustrated, exaggerated English and reluctantly agrees to this journey, thinking that the backpack full of cash the mother gave him could help him pay off his debts.

                  In contrast with the “Taken” films, this time he’s the one doing the taking, albeit for a good cause. The bulk of “The Marksman” finds Jim, Miguel, and Jackson making their way from Arizona to Illinois, the cartel villains on their tail, led by an especially over-the-top Juan Pablo Raba. Then again, all these characters are flat stereotypes of violent, Mexican thugs; the script from Lorenz, Chris Charles, and Danny Kravitz isn’t interested in exploring them any further. Even Miguel, who’s on screen nearly the entire time, isn’t developed beyond a few simple traits including sweetness, fear and a love of Pop Tarts. (He is thoughtful enough, however, to take Jackson for an early-morning walk while Jim is still sleeping off the whiskey from the night before. But be warned: A later scene involving the dog is the most stressful in the whole movie, and the most unnecessary, given that we’re already fully aware of how dangerous the pursuers are.)  

                  There aren’t many surprises on this journey, and the fact that the old-school Jim proudly carries no cell phone allows for the few hiccups that do occur along the way. (Somehow he manages to pull into a small town in the Texas panhandle and find the gun store on Main Street without the help of Yelp.) Katheryn Winnick has a barely-there supporting role as his stepdaughter, a border patrol agent who shows up every once in a while to track down his whereabouts and try to talk him into turning himself in to authorities. As for the title, Jim doesn’t really get to use his sharpshooting skills until nearly the end, right around the time his gruff demeanor softens, just like we knew it would.




                  Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-marksman-movie-review-2021
                  By: Christy Lemire
                  Posted: January 15, 2021, 1:41 pm

                  • Entertainer
                    Entertainer published a blog post MLK/FBI

                    image

                    In Sam Pollard’s superb, infuriating documentary, “MLK/FBI,” Andrew Young quotes comedian and activist Dick Gregory: “If you’re Black and not slightly paranoid, you’re sick.” It’s a fitting line for a film about J. Edgar Hoover’s widespread surveillance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. from 1963 to April 4, 1968. Tapes of these wiretaps and bugs were turned over to the National Archives in 1972, and will be available for public consumption in 2027. In the meantime, we have this powerful, upsetting record of events based on The FBI and Martin Luther King: From ‘Solo’ to Memphis by David J. Garrow. Pollard and editor Laura Tomaselli stitch together an incriminating mix of real-life footage and scenes from movies that served as law enforcement propaganda. Those images are supplemented by onscreen selections from FBI documents that paint a salacious picture of the civil rights leader they surveyed. Myth and legend are pushed aside, creating a human portrait of a great leader, warts and all.

                    Garrow is one of the talking heads here, none of whom are seen until the closing minutes. He is joined by fellow author and Hoover chronicler, Beverly Gage, King’s contemporaries Young and Clarence Jones, and former FBI employees Charles Knox and James Comey. Comey’s appearance would be jarring if it didn’t so effectively tie the past to the present; so much of “MLK/FBI” feels like a rerun of recent events rather than a predecessor. “The FBI was a part of the mainstream political order,” says Garrow near the end of the film, and he’s backed up by Gage, who points out that the FBI’s actions were not only not-so-secretive but were also popular. This is backed up by an earlier detail showing that, at the height of the battle between the FBI and Dr. King, the FBI had a 50% popularity rating compared to King’s 17%.

                    “MLK/FBI” accomplishes many things, starting with reminding audiences just how dangerous and militant King was perceived to be by White America in the 1960s. Gone is the “Santafication” of Dr. King, to use that line from “The Black Power Mixtape.” The guy whose “I Have a Dream” speech has been bastardized by liberals and conservatives who dishonestly used it as a Kumbaya excuse to ignore racism is seen making other speeches, ones that aren’t so easily distilled of their anger and disappointment. In fact, a few weeks after The March on Washington, Hoover sent a memo saying, “It’s clear that Martin Luther King is the most dangerous Negro in America.” The FBI head’s “fear of a Black Messiah” may have been the impetus for tailing King in the first place.

                    Pollard shows the dirty hands of several beloved figures. We learn that the FBI needed Attorney General approval for wiretaps, which was granted by Bobby Kennedy. And the film critics and pundits who complained that Ava DuVernay’s “Selma” didn’t kiss LBJ’s ass enough will be put in their place by some of the audio and the details here. But the primary focus is on Hoover, who felt that the “moral leader of the Negroes” should be without sin, and King, who like every other human being besides Jesus’ Mom, often found sinning irresistible. Those aforementioned tapes collected by the FBI contained instances of King in adulterous situations, with the goal of exposing his sexual habits to destroy his reputation. The mere mention of adultery alone could have done this, but the FBI wanted to ensure the details were so graphic that they would shame the Devil. This is in large part why “MLK/FBI” is so infuriating; imagine all the carnal pleasures you’re into being broadcast to the world in an attempt to discredit you. If this doesn’t terrify you, your freaky-deaky needs more seasoning.

                    “MLK/FBI” doesn’t give a pass to King’s indiscretions, but it does interrogate the reasons why Hoover thought this tactic was necessary. Through his confidant, Sam Levison, King had already been linked to the “–ism Boogeyman” America accuses Black folks of playing footsie with whenever we demand equal rights (communism then, socialism now). Using clips and narration, Pollard and his subjects break down how Black men were constantly seen as a sexual threat, especially to White women. D.W. Griffith does his part to promote this in the expected clips from “The Birth of a Nation,” but this film delves deeper, pointing out that Hoover’s perception of Black sexuality was filtered through that same viewpoint. Whatever King was doing in those tapes (and like Charles Knox says in the film, I’ve no desire to find out), it was considered beyond hypersexual and deranged by the supposedly strait-laced Hoover. The head of the G-men was furious that most newspapers and journalists wouldn’t take the bait, so he had his team cut together an audio sex tape and sent it, along with a threatening letter, to Coretta Scott King.

                    “As humans, we are best at convincing ourselves of our own righteousness,” Gage tells us. This type of delusion is heightened and exploited by propaganda. While Hoover saw his nemesis as Sweet Sweetback, he saw his FBI as a bastion of good, a line of bullshit Hollywood directly injected into the veins of numerous movies and TV shows. This aided and abetted the FBI’s public persona, one that Hoover ably cast from his own ideal vision. When someone said “G-man,” you knew exactly what they looked like: stern, White, buffed and wearing a suit and tie. This spreading of a brand is no different than Twitter today; what’s impressive is how well these notions took root in the days before smartphones and social media.

                    Meanwhile, Dr. King is being tarred by the FBI as “the most notorious liar,” a story the Washington Post and the New York Times are happy to splash across their front pages. This gets more coverage than King’s Nobel Peace Prize and leads to the one meeting between King and Hoover. Since the press was not allowed, there’s no footage to show. Instead, we see the post-meeting press conference, where King navigates the minefield set for him by reporters. Pollard shows this as a bit of a bookend to an earlier clip where a White woman from UPI makes absurd, gaslighting statements that sound like what we heard from GOP politicians last week: “If you offend your oppressors, you’ll ruin unity by making them hurt you more.”

                    Since “MLK/FBI” unfolds in chronological order, we eventually get to King’s objections to the Vietnam War, including the same April 4, 1967 speech Spike Lee opened “Da 5 Bloods” with last year. King’s “no-war” policy, coupled with his “Poor People’s Campaign,” severed the ties between him and LBJ. “It’s a cruel jest to say to a bootless man he ought to lift himself up by his bootstraps,” King says, expressing that money for the war should go to the homeland’s war on poverty. Hoover exploits this rift with LBJ’s blessing, upping the surveillance and even adding details that may or may not be true. It all ends on April 4, 1968, we’re told, and the film suddenly cuts to black because we know what happened on that day.

                    I watched “MLK/FBI” for the second time on the same day my television filled with images of the Capitol being overrun by the kind of violent insurrectionists Hoover and his minions said the Civil Rights movement would incite. The film played no differently than when I saw it back in September at the New York Film Festival, which is truly sad. The archival footage Pollard uses has people saying the same things they’re saying today, and the same negative ideas are being thrown around in regard to the rights of Black and brown people. It feels like “Groundhog Day,” with no end to the cycle in sight. There’s a line in this film that sticks with me. It implies that nothing will change unless America deals with “the fear of Black people forcing a reckoning with the American past.” That reckoning is past due.

                    Now available in select theaters and on demand.




                    Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/mlkfbi-movie-review-2021
                    By: Odie Henderson
                    Posted: January 15, 2021, 1:42 pm

                    • Entertainer
                      Entertainer published a blog post Film About A Father Who

                      image

                      Every father is a bundle of contradictions. But in Ira Sachs, Sr.'s case, the contradictions are more extreme than most. Filmmaker Lynne Sachs tries to make sense of them—up to a point—in "A Film About a Father Who," an unraveling of her family's complicated history, drawn from footage that she's been gathering between 1984 and the present day. 

                      Known as "the Hugh Hefner of Park City," the Utah ski town where Robert Redford founded the Sundance Film Festival, Sachs at his life-force peak was a hotel developer, a devoted skier, a prodigious pot smoker, and a womanizer whose affairs ultimately produced nine children by five women. He emerges here as an infuriating but charismatic figure whose life holds many secrets, and who treats his children and ex-wife (and various girlfriends) with a mix of genuine warmth and shocking selfishness and manipulation. 

                      The filmmaker has been directing movies for a long time, building an archive of experimental features and shorts. Some were offered, at the time this review was written, in a virtual film festival online at the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens, New York. Sachs is the sister of Ira Sachs ("Keep the Lights On," "Love is Strange"), and based on the interviews collected here, the whole extended family has an artistic and/or literary mindset even when they make a living some other way. We hear a lot about how playful, adventurous and bold the father was, back in the day, but also how emotionally remote (one child says that he seemed to exist in a detached-seeming middleground, rarely manifesting extremes of euphoria/happiness or anger/sadness. 

                      There's a lot of sardonic quipping about his sex life, which impacted the children (and his eventual ex-wife) in ways that troubled everyone but him. The ostensible trigger for this film was the 2016 revelation that there were two other children by yet another woman, beyond the ones that were already known about, their names blacked-out in an insurance document. The movie never gets into why this particular bit of information would shock the family into taking stock of things when the list of prior outrages and scandals was so prodigiously long. It's not a failing, exactly, but it does momentarily cause the viewer to ask questions that fall beyond the scope of the film itself. One of the director's siblings weeps as she talks of learning in youth that she had other siblings out there, but being made to wait to meet them, because her father was adamant that they not be connected until his own mother had passed on. Why? She wants to know. Why place such a restriction on truth? Who was being protected?

                      Kaleidoscopic in both its assortment of materials and its assemblage, this feature doesn't so much sort out and organize all the different aspects of the father's life as sift through them in a fixated, somewhat discombobulated way— like a detective poring over contents of a thick file that have spilled out all over the floor, properly impressed by how much work has to be done to even start to understand all the complexities; or, to be more mundane, like a child who has learned a new, unpleasant truth about a parent, in addition to the other unpleasant truths she already knew, and is reeling in shock even as she tries to reframe the picture in a calm and rational way.

                      The array of formats displayed is so texturally diverse—encompassing Super 8mm and 16mm film, VHS and other low-resolution video formats, and more crisp, high-definition digital video in recent scenes—that the movie is always fascinating, even when it seems to lose or drop the threads of therapeutic/psychological understanding woven throughout the project. 

                      It's sometimes hard to tell if the fragmentation in the story and the more atmospheric and/or dislocating touches (such as sound dropouts, and dialogue-as-narration by witnesses who are heard speaking over silent footage of people in earlier time periods, sometimes with their own lips moving) are urgently necessary to aid our understanding and feeling, or if they are vestigial outgrowths of the way an experimental filmmaker typically works (intuitively and viscerally, without obsessing over linear clarity). But there's no denying that these sometimes alienating touches add to our sense of the father as a towering presence in the lives of his children, not always for noble reasons. 

                      One of the most striking things about the movie is how it reveals the way in which all adult children feel forever small when contemplating the life experience of their parents: the brave or reckless choices, the beneficial and destructive outcomes, the redactions and blank spots, and the mysteries that will never be solved.




                      Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/film-about-a-father-who-movie-review-2021
                      By: Matt Zoller Seitz
                      Posted: January 15, 2021, 9:42 pm

                    • image

                      Oscar-winning filmmaker Spike Lee became the 34th recipient of the American Cinematheque Award during a two-hour virtual ceremony held yesterday, January 14th, and I couldn't agree more with their choice of recipient. Lee was a filmmaker greatly admired and championed by my late husband, Roger Ebert, and I shared his admiration of Lee. I have watched Spike's career from the beginning, and watching a "Spike Lee" film is always interesting and enjoyable, irrespective of whether you agree with some of his choices. He is quite simply a talented auteur and watching some of his films in a shot-by-shot format is like going to film school. Off the screen, Spike also deserves kudos for leading the charge to admit more diverse filmmakers to the unions. And I admire his courage and passion in speaking truth to power when it comes to issues affecting African-Americans, and America as a whole. His continued efforts for equality in Hollywood have been noted around the world and make him an ideal elder statesman. But fortunately he is not resting on his laurels, he has many more films to direct.

                      Hosted by Jodie Foster, who co-starred in Lee's 2006 thriller, "Inside Man," the ceremony featured heartfelt tributes from many of the filmmaker's cherished collaborators, who conversed in pairs to reveal the particulars of his genius. Guests included "Chi-Raq" star Angela Bassett, "Malcolm X" editor Barry Alexander Brown, "Bamboozled" costume designer Ruth E. Carter, "BlacKkKlansman" casting director Kim Coleman, "Black Panther" director Ryan Coogler (one of Lee's former students at NYU), "Mo' Better Blues" cinematographer Ernest Dickerson, "Do the Right Thing" producer Jon Kilik, "4 Little Girls" cinematographer Ellen Kuras, "Do the Right Thing" star Rosie Perez, "Jungle Fever" editor Sam Pollard, "Clockers" casting director Robi Reed, "Do the Right Thing" producer Monty Ross and "She's Gotta Have It" production designer Wynn Thomas.

                      "You have to work on your craft no matter what it is — you have to work, you have to work, you have to work," Lee said in conversation with Foster. "If you love what you are doing you can delay Father Time, so I have some more joints to make. At the very beginning I wanted to build a body of work because I noticed the artists I admired kept building their body of work. It wasn’t just a one-and-done thing. Over the years they kept working on their craft. For me that was the model."

                      The director also paid tribute to the late star of his latest acclaimed narrative feature, "Da 5 Bloods," Chadwick Boseman (who played a heroic platoon leader), saying, "The character in 'Da 5 Bloods' is so enormous — you just can’t cast anybody. He is described as mythic. You are talking about a guy who played Jackie Robinson, James Brown, Thurgood Marshall, Black Panther." Boseman's "Da 5 Bloods" co-stars—Norm Lewis, Delroy Lindo, Jonathan Majors, Clarke Peters and Isiah Whitlock Jr.—appeared together to virtually give Lee his award.

                      "There are filmmakers who create entertainment for the world. and there are those who create commentaries for our world," said Jonathan Majors. "Personally I don’t know another person that so naturally and so honestly creates both time and time again. Hopefully all artistic artists grow in their craft, Spike, but you started with compassion and guts and truth. Vision ferocious before anyone knew who you were, and passion before anyone knew that you are. I know that from courtside at the Knicks game and hanging out with you, and having a beer with you in Thailand, you don’t speak through your art, you speak through your humanity."

                      Two of Lee's movies cracked the top five of RogerEbert.com's combined list ranking the best films of 2020: "David Byrne's American Utopia" (#3) and "Da 5 Bloods" (#5). And Roger famously vowed to boycott the Cannes Film Festival when "Do The Right Thing" did not win an award there. He said that film was one of the few movies that ever made him shed a tear. He wrote in his four-star review of "Do the Right Thing," "I believe that any good-hearted person, white or black, will come out of this movie with sympathy for all of the characters. Lee does not ask us to forgive them, or even to understand everything they do, but he wants us to identify with their fears and frustrations." 

                      You can find links to all of Roger's writing on the career of Lee here

                      Also be sure to watch Lee's virtual conversation with "Moonlight" director Barry Jenkins held last year by the American Cinematheque in the video embedded below.




                      Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/festivals/spike-lee-recieves-american-cinematheque-award
                      By: Chaz Ebert
                      Posted: January 15, 2021, 7:06 pm

                    • நூல் : சலாம் இஸ்லாம்

                      ஆசிரியர் : களந்தை பீர்முகம்மது

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                      மின்னஞ்சல் : kalanthaipeermohamed@gmail.com

                      அட்டைப்படம் : Sathya

                      experimentsofme@gmail.com

                      மின்னூலாக்கம் : லெனின் குருசாமி
                      மின்னஞ்சல் : guruleninn@gmail.com

                      வெளியிடு : FreeTamilEbooks.com

                      உரிமை : CC-ND-NC-BY-SA

                      உரிமை – கிரியேட்டிவ் காமன்ஸ். எல்லாரும் படிக்கலாம், பகிரலாம்.

                       

                       

                       

                      பதிவிறக்க*

                      ஆன்ட்ராய்டு(FBreader), ஆப்பிள், புது நூக் கருவிகளில் படிக்க

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                      பழைய கிண்டில்,நூக் கருவிகளில் படிக்க

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                      பிற வடிவங்களில் படிக்க – https://archive.org/details/salam_islam

                      புத்தக எண் – 678




                      Original: https://freetamilebooks.com/ebooks/salam_islam/
                      By: admin
                      Posted: January 16, 2021, 3:29 am

                      சலாம் இஸ்லாம் – சிறுகதை – களந்தை பீர்முகம்மது
                    • நூல் : கலைச்சொற்களை செந்தரமாக்கல்

                      ஆசிரியர் : செ. கோட்டாளம்

                      image
                      மின்னஞ்சல் : jkottalam@gmail.com

                      அட்டைப்படம் : லெனின் குருசாமி

                      guruleninn@gmail.com

                      மின்னூலாக்கம் : லெனின் குருசாமி
                      மின்னஞ்சல் : guruleninn@gmail.com

                      வெளியிடு : FreeTamilEbooks.com

                      உரிமை : CC-BY-SA

                      உரிமை – கிரியேட்டிவ் காமன்ஸ். எல்லாரும் படிக்கலாம், பகிரலாம்.

                       

                       

                       

                      பதிவிறக்க*

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                      புத்தக எண் – 677




                      Original: https://freetamilebooks.com/ebooks/kalai_sol_sentharamaakkal/
                      By: admin
                      Posted: January 15, 2021, 2:15 pm

                      கலைச்சொற்களை செந்தரமாக்கல் – கட்டுரை – செ. கோட்டாளம்
                    •   "We are the closest thing to competition Facebook or Twitter has seen in many years. I believe Amazon, Google, Apple worked together to try and ensure they don't have competition," says Parler CEO John Matze.  With Goliaths Twitter, FB and Google acting increasingly like power-mad fascists and Big Brother Thought Police, a battle of the new and smaller competing Social Media platforms is now



                      Original: https://apologika.blogspot.com/2021/01/will-new-social-network-be-your-new.html
                      By: ApoLogika
                      Posted: January 10, 2021, 12:25 pm

                    •   Muslims continue to use heretical Jehovah's Witness arguments even though they should know better by now. For instance, the JW misinterpretation of Luke 18:19.
                        Like JWs, Muslims will take this one verse and wrench it out of its Biblical context to try to reject Jesus' claim of deity in the passage.

                      (the original slide is from the slideshow titled "Counterfeit Christs" which may be found 



                      Original: https://apologika.blogspot.com/2020/07/why-do-some-muslims-claim-that-jesus-is.html
                      By: ApoLogika
                      Posted: July 8, 2020, 12:43 am

                    •   Muslims frequently claim that they love Jesus more than Christians do because they pray exactly as Jesus did. To support this claim, they quote Matthew 26:39, saying that this verse describes the kneeling that Muslims do whenever they bow to Muhammad's Allah. In short, kneeling with their forehead to the ground as the Muslim in this picture is doing:

                        But this is what we find in the Gospel



                      Original: https://apologika.blogspot.com/2020/06/do-muslims-really-pray-as-lord-jesus-did.html
                      By: ApoLogika
                      Posted: June 29, 2020, 5:33 am

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